What you need to know about Planning Permission for your Garden

What you need to know about Planning Permission for your Garden

Garden Planning Permission 

Wondering if you’ve achieved the full potential in your garden? For most of us, our garden or outdoor space is just that – a place for potential! Space that comes into its own only in the summer. Think again.

Live the garden life you imagined!

These unprecedented times have meant that many of us are now reconsidering and realising the potential of what our gardens can offer. Pizza ovens, bars, and summer houses, to name but a few, have come into their own. These structures have added a new dimension to our lives – we can benefit from additional space, a chance to extend our season, or a separate workspace. Don’t be put off worrying about the permissions you may or may not need. Here are our top tips to give you a guide on what’s required.  Go for it and live the garden life you’ve imagined!

When Do I Need Planning Permission?

Your garden is your own space, but it’s important to ensure you get permission when you need it. There are some restrictions if you live in areas such as Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty (or AONB) or in a Conservation Area, among other restricted areas, so check out your Local Council Planning Portal to ensure you’re in the clear.  For the sake of neighbourliness, we’d also suggest you let your neighbours know what you’re planning but at the outset, we always recommend you adhere to your local Council’s guidelines.  

Shed Ready

Get Shed Ready

You do not normally need planning permission to build a shed in your own garden unless its footprint is over 15 square metres, or takes up more than half of your garden space.  If the shed is used for usual ‘shed purposes’ such as a workshop, storage for garden tools, and the such like, then you will not need permission. Keep it under 2m in height as well and you’re in the clear.  Our extensive range of sheds provides a wide choice of garden structures that fit within the required remits.  From traditional apex sheds in tannalised wood, to pressure treated overlap, there is something for you.

Business Ready

Get Business Ready

If you’re considering running a business from your garden then you will need permission. It’s worth including this permission on your priority list if you’re setting up a business. If you’re using your garden structure as a home office, or an opportunity to work from home outside of your own house, then you shouldn’t need permission.  

Summer Houses and Gazebos

These structures fall under the same remit as sheds and with the necessary measurements in line with restrictions, then you shouldn’t have to ask permission. Keeping your neighbours in the loop on your plans is just plain good old courtesy and it’s always worth considering how you’d feel if a wood structure close to your boundary fence appeared without consultation. It’s always worth mentioning

New Fence New View

Fences are traditionally based on the non-permission-necessary maximum height of 2m, or 1m near a highway or a pedestrian path alongside a highway. Don’t forget that trellis above a fence counts within the full height. If relevant to you, always remember to check whether you own all your boundary fencing is yours. Sometimes your neighbour may be responsible for one side of your fencing. To all intents and purposes, they may well be delighted to enjoy a new fence but check ahead just in case.

Greenhouses

Greenhouses For The Green Fingered

Greenhouses fall under the same rules as garden sheds. Dependent on your space and needs, our greenhouses are made within the permissions. Whether you want a simple cold frame or a full-blown Victorian walk around the greenhouse, you’re good to go with Timberworld.

Feeling Inspired?

Check out all our garden structures and get busy. Our gardens are a resource that should be maximised so why not consider how best you can enhance its uses with a structure to compliment your lifestyle? Get inspired here.

If you’re after additional reassurance when planning a garden structure, or make-over, then visit the Government’s Planning Portal here. Alternatively, contact your local council as some rules may differ according to your area.